dynamicoceans:

Many people assume that the Manta Ray is dangerous due to the fact that the Sting Ray is. However, they don’t have a stinger at all. X

dynamicoceans:

Many people assume that the Manta Ray is dangerous due to the fact that the Sting Ray is. However, they don’t have a stinger at all. X

thelovelyseas:

Coral reef in Komodo National Park in Komodo, Indonesia. The reefs in Komodo are among the richest in the world and home to over 1,000 types of fish, nearly 400 varieties of coral, 70 kinds of sponges and several types of whales, sharks, turtles and dolphins by Michael Patrick O’Neill

joshpeck:

becausebirds:

How my Red-tailed Hawk says hello. x

WHO JUST OWNS A HAWK

thecryptocreep:

"…Goodnight ladies and gentlemen."

Destination Truth: Island of Dolls

n8yager:

Enoshima Aquarium [x]

nubbsgalore:

baby japanese macaques, aslo known as snow monkeys, in the joshinetsu kogen national park. located in the valley of the yokoyu river in the northern part of nagano prefecture, the areas remains relatively free of humans thanks to heavy snowfalls, an elevation of 850 meters, and being accessible only via a narrow two kilometer footpath through the forest.

photos by (click pic) ben torodeoscar tarneberg, kiyo photography, stephano sityziakoichi kamoshidamarcosjra and patypatyapaty, tubasa-wingsdaisuke tashiro and masashi mochida

spaceplasma:

Animations of Saturn’s aurorae

Earth isn’t the only planet in the solar system with spectacular light shows. Both Jupiter and Saturn have magnetic fields much stronger than Earth’s. Auroras also have been observed on the surfaces of Venus, Mars and even on moons (e.g. Io, Europa, and Ganymede). The auroras on Saturn are created when solar wind particles are channeled into the planet’s magnetic field toward its poles, where they interact with electrically charged gas (plasma) in the upper atmosphere and emit light. Aurora features on Saturn can also be caused by electromagnetic waves generated when its moons move through the plasma that fills the planet’s magnetosphere.  The main source is the small moon Enceladus, which ejects water vapor from the geysers on its south pole, a portion of which is ionized. The interaction between Saturn’s magnetosphere and the solar wind generates bright oval aurorae around the planet’s poles observed in visible, infrared and ultraviolet light. The aurorae of Saturn are highly variable. Their location and brightness strongly depends on the Solar wind pressure: the aurorae become brighter and move closer to the poles when the Solar wind pressure increases.

Credit: ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada)